Black Russian Terrier breed profile

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Training and intelligence
With Black Russian Terriers, you need to start training as early as possible, and be gentle but firm. These dogs want to please, and are very clever.

Temperament
This breed is brave and very protective. Black Russian Terriers love children and have a very playful streak.

Attitude towards strange dogs and people
The Black Russian Terrier is not a dominant dog, but it is advisable to socialise them well so that they do not become over protective.

Grooming and shedding
Weekly brushing will keep the coat in good condition, and Black Russian Terriers shed little.

Exercise
Black Russian Terriers like plenty of regular exercise. Many enjoy swimming too, which can a useful alternative exercise as the large bone and muscle systems grow and settle.

Need for company
A Black Russian Terrier who is allowed close contact with his people is a happy one. They do not like to be left alone too much.

General
Black Russian Terriers are slow to mature, which means there will be a period of time where you have a large dog with the mind of a puppy, so train early and be patient.

Find familiy friendly Black Russian Terrier videos at All Dog Videos.

Books

Black Russian Terrier: Special Rare-Breed Edition : A Comprehensive Owner's Guide (Kennel Club Dog Breed Series)

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From $22 used.

Imposing and solid black, this modern-day Russian creation has turned many heads in the dog world for its size, versatility and striking appearance. The Black Russian Terrier was developed in Russia to be an all-around worker and protection dog, and today the breed is all that plus much more. ....


Photos

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Kalinka's Illarion (Lari) Iz Teremka, Best of Breed

Kalinka's Illarion (Lari) Iz Teremka strikes a pose as he wins best of breed

Kalinka's Illarion (Lari) Iz Teremka strikes a pose as he wins best of breed

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Indrik - 4 months old

Indrik was 'helping' in the garden. :)

Indrik was 'helping' in the garden. :)

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Sam and Daisy : Black Russian Terrier

Dogs name: Sam and DaisyOwners Name: Mitch from SaumurOur two black shadows!!!

Dogs name: Sam and Daisy
Owners Name: Mitch from Saumur
Our two black shadows!!!

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OH. ONE THING I FEEL I SHOULD POINT OUT, IS THAT THEY ARE DEFINATLY THE MOST MESSY DOG YOU CAN GET. " I KNOW!! ILL JUMP IN THE SLIMY POND, THEN ROLL IN THE ASH FROM THE BONFIRE, A QUICK JUMP IN THE MUD, AND RUN INTO THE HOUSE TO CHECK MY FAMILLY ARE OK. HANG ON. HES ASLEEP ON HIS FAVOURITE SOFA! IM SURE THERE'S ROOM FOR ME ON THERE TO"

i was given a brt 2 yrs ago she is called tally. I have never known a dog like her she is so clever with a great temperment she seems to know what i am saying to her she is wonderful and i would recomend a BRT to anyone. She gets on so well with my daughter So if you are looking for a dog she is the best and we love her

I am a dog trainer and an owner of a BRT. I had met (and trained) quite a few BRTs before I went to Moscow to choose the dog I own now. My last dog was a wonderful Giant Schnauzer who was with me for 10 years. I would just like to say that dispite the larger size, a BRT is an "easier" dog than a Giant Schnauzer in many ways. This was one of the reasons I desided to get one (and not a Giant). I am older now, have started a family and don't have the passion for working with my dog (or the time and energy) that I did when I had my Giant.

To put it plainly, a BRT is mostly a Giant with some Newfoundland blood (the bit of Rottie, Airdale, a various shepherds, in their blood is quite watered down). This makes for a Giant Schnauzer "looking" dog but of course larger. This also makes for a far less dominant dog (at least with the family) and a less energetic dog, therefore an "easier dog". Giants are braver (sometimes even foolishly so) and often more troublesome (at least in the wrong hands). The Russian police trainers that work with a great BRT will usually say "He is so good, almost has the drive of a Giant Schnauzer!", to describe a BRT with more nerve and aggression and speed than average.

On the other hand, physically the BRT is stronger than the Giant and although he is not quite as agile as the Giant, he is surprisingly limber and fast for his size.
So, even though the BRT may be an easier dog, day to day, it is not a "soft" dog by any means and not a dog to mess with. Their jaw strength surpases every breed I have worked with (including the my amazing Giant and of course Pit-Bulls). In my oppinion, if all you want is a sweet pet you have no business owning either of the two breeds (or any other guarding breed for that matter).

Both breeds should be owned by experienced owners and people with common sense but I just wanted to mention that of the two, the Giant needs a more dominant owner, who is more athletic and has more time for the dog.

It is funny that the Black Russian Terrier is (in temperament) less of a Terrier than the Giant Schnauzer... both are incredibly intelligent dogs (smarter than all other breeds in my oppinion) but as much as they look the same, the Giant is not just a smaller BRT.

I have never had a black russian before but i have had a giant schnauzer which look very similar to them.We are about to get a black russian though.I have done lots of reseach and they seem to be very playfull!The fact that a grown dog might jump up at me and play is not a problem because i know they are very caring dogs.
Giant schnauzers are really cute as well and very simular so if you dont want a BRT for a certain reason a giant schnauzer will be perfect and caring.

We have two blackies, our black shadows because they like to follow you everywhere, and I would readily have another if anything happened to these two. They are the best company, they are very adaptable - they are couch potatoes when you are and ready to go out and explore when you want to. They are intelligent dogs and only bark when they think it is necessary - no frivolous barking. They are large and powerful so not for anyone who is frail, although they are very gentle around my eighty year old mum! They are excellent with children. Having a pair of them ensures that when you can't be with them they have a playmate at least. They are very good guard dogs, very impressive to look at. They learn very quickly so make sure they are learning the right things! Sam the male is very laid back and doesn't chase our cat but the young female Daisy still has a prey-driven attitude (she is only 20 months) so I don't know if that is her terrier character or if she will grow out of it. For a large dog they are very affectionate, need your company and are a joy to own.